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    Cleo will bark at you if you click the picture

 

   Honors/Lab Philosophy  

 

As far as I am concerned, "Honors" has NOTHING to do with increasing the assignment load of the students.  I believe it is the level of instruction that makes a course "Honors."  I ask the same assignments of all my students in every class I teach, Honors or not.  The difference is in the level of the instruction.  I am a reader for the National AP Exam in many subject areas.  I attend AP Institute regularly so that I learn how to prepare scholars to take the national standardized tests in the subject matter.  I bring these materials to class to share with my students, whenever possible.  It is "Honors" because the materials taught are a cut above the norm, not because of the amount of unnecessary memory work for the student generated.  Basically, I challenge myself to teach the course with increased fervor.  It is called "Honors" because it is a better course, not a more arduous program.

 

I do not and will never show experiments in any of my classes or recorded products.  I believe that lab should be a discovery exercise and that part of that discovery encompasses the mistakes that ultimately get made.  By showing your student the results and set up of the experiment in advance, I feel that he or she is being robbed of a valuable learning/problem solving opportunity.  I do give a pre lab which helps the student with the experience, but I do not show the experiment itself.  I see no reason to show a video of a hands-on learning activity.  Doing so defeats the purpose of performing the lab in my opinion.

 

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